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Rabbit cages need to be a minimum of five times the size of your rabbit. The larger the rabbit cage, the better. Bunny needs lots of room to easily move around, stretch out and stand up on his hind legs without bumping his head on the top of the cage. Keeping a rabbit in a cage is acceptable, if you allow your bunny at least a few hours of play time each day outside his cage. You might also consider keeping your rabbit in a “bunny proofed room,” a custom enclosure or puppy pen. Rabbits do not have protective pads on the bottoms of their feet (like cats and dogs,) so if you are using a wire cage, be sure to put a layer of cardboard or other material in the bottom. It’s also a good idea to place a cardboard box or “rabbit condo” inside the cage so your pet has a comfortable place to “hide” and for quiet time. Rabbits normally sleep both day and night and become active at dusk and dawn. Many people also prefer wire cages because they can put a litter box underneath. However, if you do this, be sure to still place cardboard or a piece of wood over part of the cage for your rabbit to stand on.

Rabbit cages need to be big enough to accommodate food, water, toys and sometimes a litter pan. Other rabbit homes that are good options include puppy pens, which can be purchased at most pet supply stores. Puppy pens are usually large enough to hold all of your rabbit’s essentials and they are easy to move. Another option is building a custom rabbit enclosure. NOTE: Never build a rabbit enclosure with chicken wire because they can chew the wire and it may injure them. Some supply stores sell wire storage cubes that can be customized for many different arrangements. If you custom build a cage, remember the wood slats should be fairly close together. Otherwise, your rabbit could get his head caught through the slats and strangle.


 


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